BC's Indigenous Public Post-Secondary Institute

Community and Public Safety Professional Certificate Program


Department: CAREER TRAINING (JUSTICE STUDIES)
Program Delivery Location: Merritt
Credential: Certificate
Format: Full-Time
Start Dates: TBD

Community and Public Safety Professional Certificate Program

The Community and Public Safety Professional Certificate program prepares students for a career in the public safety sector. Graduates will be able to use their certificate to pursue applying to their field of interest within public safety agencies.


Graduates will be able to pursue multiple career pathways in the field of public safety. By moving from policing specific and a tone of law enforcement, the revised program will introduce students to a variety of opportunities including but not limited to, policing, corrections, border services, conservation, bylaw, sheriff, SPCA, coroner, Fisheries and Ocean Canada, probation, military, and commercial vehicle safety. As students explore the various professions in the sector, they will also examine the complex socio-historical relationship between Canada and Indigenous people, thus challenging their beliefs and assumptions about present day relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, specifically in the criminal justice system. In doing so, learners will develop an enhanced understanding of the impact of colonization on Indigenous people and be better prepared in their selected field and the people they serve.



The Community and Public Safety Certificate Program aims to provide graduates with:



  • a decolonized perspective on criminal justice and a deepened understanding of traditional justice practices relevant to a contemporary movement toward alternative methods for addressing crime and punishment;

  • an enhanced understanding of recent publications relevant to the field of public safety including but not limited to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's (TRC) Calls to Action, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) and Bill 41 in British Columbia, and the Murder and Missing Indigenous Women and

    Girls Inquiry (MMIWG) and the relationship between public safety and the purpose of these documents;

  • an understanding of the disparities that exist in the criminal justice system that has contributed to the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in the system;

  • an understanding of the mistrust that Indigenous people have for Canada's criminal justice system;

  • an understanding of how political, social and economic environments contribute to challenges faced by Indigenous people;

  • an understanding of public service theory and practice; 

  • excellent interpersonal communication skills;

  • a professional manner;

  • empathetic and caring attitude;

  • a basic understanding of trauma-informed practice;

  • an understanding of public safety principles and ethics;

  • problem solving abilities;

  • an ability to work effectively individually and in groups;

  • a combination of academic, experiential and community-based learning; and

  • skills for self care and mindfulness.


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS



  • Be a minimum of 18 years of age by the start of the program or obtain permission from the program;

  • Grade 12 or equivalent or mature student status

  • C+ minimum in English Studies 12 or English First Peoples 12 or English 12 or English 060;

  • Foundations of Mathematics 11 or MATH 057;

  • Be a Canadian Citizen or have Permanant Resident status;

  • Completed Medical Clearance Form from Physician; and

  • Completed Criminal Record Check.


APPLICATION READINESS


Applicants are encouraged to meet academic requirements before program entry.


Applicants must contact their local RCMP detachment to complete a current criminal record check and are responsible for associated fees.


Applicants must contact their local physician to obtain medical clearance to participate in the program, which includes physical education and simulated fitness tests.


Applicants are required to possess a valid, unrestricted Canadian-issued Class 5 driver’s license to apply to most fields in public safety; therefore, applicants are encouraged to start the process of obtaining their license before program completion. 


Professional requirements for a career in the public safety field include an enhanced reliability security check and hearing and vision testing. Although these are not requirements for program admission, applicants should consider these requirements when selecting their career pathway.

NVIT is committed to ensuring education is accessible to all people. Students who do not meet program requirements should contact the Department Head or an NVIT Academic Planner regarding upgrading opportunities.

Certificate Completion Plan
In total, learners enroled in the Community and Public Safety Professional Certificate program will earn 36.0 credits in the program.
  • CAPS-100 - Physical Education Development for Public Safety I
  • CAPS-101 - Physical Education Development for Public Safety II
  • CAPS-110 - Introduction to Public Safety
  • CAPS-120 - Intro to Interpersonal Violence and Intro to Interpersonal Violence and
  • CAPS-140 - Criminal Justice Studies I
  • CAPS-141 - Criminal Justice Studies Ii
  • CAPS-145 - Public Safety Investigational Techniques
  • CAPS-150 - Public Safety: Special Topics
  • CAPS-160 - Approaches to Conflict Resolution I
  • ENGL-101 - Foundations for Academic Writing
  • ENGL-110 - English Composition
  • PSYC-111 - Introduction to Psychology I
  • Course Listing for this program

    CAPS-100 - Credits: 3.000
    Physical Education Development for Public Safety I
    This course introduces learners to fitness and lifestyle management requirements specific to the field of public safety. Learners explore nutrition, stress management, physical aptitude through techniques such as weight training, anaerobic, aerobic and cardio-vascular capabilities by employing a variety of methods. Physical aptitude assessments will take place throughout the term. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: Program Admission
    CAPS-101 - Credits: 3.000
    Physical Education Development for Public Safety II
    This course builds on Physical Education Development for Public Safety I and further develops fitness and lifestyle management requirements specific to the field of public safety. Learners will apply knowledge related to nutrition, stress management, physical aptitude to physical fitness methods to improve on weight training, anaerobic, aerobic and cardio-vascular capabilities. Physical aptitude assessments will continue through the term. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: CAPS-100
    CAPS-110 - Credits: 3.000
    Introduction to Public Safety
    This purpose of this course is to provide a career orientation to public safety and address barriers by connecting students with tools and resources to support success in the program and the pursuance of career pathways. Learners will be introduced to current topics in Indigenous relations in Canada including the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC), United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP) and Bill-41, and the Inquiry into the Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) and become familiar with trauma-informed practice as it relates to public safety. Additionally, earners will examine the field of public safety by reviewing the professional requirements and expectations on public safety professionals to ensure learner preparedness through topics such as volunteerism, lifestyle management, decision-making, goal setting, learner and professional responsibilities, and holistic wellness and self-care strategies. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: Program Admission
    CAPS-120 - Credits: 3.000
    Intro to Interpersonal Violence and Intro to Interpersonal Violence and
    This course is designed to introduce learners to interpersonal violence and abuse in Indigenous communities through a trauma informed lens. Learners will explore the impact of colonialism on the historical, political, and socio-economic realities of Indigenous communities that have led to intergenerational trauma, increased rates of interpersonal violence and Indigenous mistrust in Canada's criminal justice system. Learners will explore the systemic influences that have contributed to the vulnerability of Indigenous women and the resulting inquiry into Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women and Girls (MMWIG). Using the cycle of interpersonal violence and abuse as a model, learners will examine the characteristics, dynamics, and motivations of both victims and offenders as well as use a community-based response to address patterns of violence and develop reduction and prevention strategies. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: Program Admission
    CAPS-140 - Credits: 3.000
    Criminal Justice Studies I
    This course is an introduction to the Canadian Criminal Justice System (CJS). Learners will study the structure and jurisdictions of the different levels of government and will follow an offender through the judicial process. Learners will be able to describe powers and authorities involving non-Indigenous and Indigenous offenders and options available for sentencing in both Indigenous and non-Indigenous justice systems. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: Program Admission
    CAPS-141 - Credits: 3.000
    Criminal Justice Studies Ii
    This course provides an overview of the public safety sector in Canada. Learners will be introduced to responsibilities of professionals in the field and will explore activities related to public safety. This course examines the gaps in the existing criminal justice system that has resulted in the overrepresentation of Indigenous peoples in the system as both victims and offenders. Professional expectations including ethics, responsibilities, the Incident Management Intervention Model (IMIM), and the CAPRA (Clients, Acquiring/Analyzing Information, Partnerships, Response, Assessment) will be explored and role-play and experiential components will be used throughout. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: CAPS-140
    CAPS-145 - Credits: 3.000
    Public Safety Investigational Techniques
    This course utilizes a problem-based learning model that requires learner interaction and role-playing. Learners will practice the process of applying informed and modern approaches to investigating criminal offences and are introduced to the procedures and processes of investigational duties as related to public safety. More Details on this course
    CAPS-150 - Credits: 3.000
    Public Safety: Special Topics
    Learners will explore career pathways and training opportunities for Indigenous and non-Indigenous learners in the public safety sector. This course provides learners with an opportunity to explore career pathways and professional opportunities in the public safety sector. Emphasis is placed on guest speakers who provide an overview of their professionalization and allowing learners to research areas of interest in written and oral assignments. Through this process, learners will gain an understanding of the specific professional requirements for their area of interest and develop a network of contacts in the field. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: CAPS-110 / CAPS-140
    CAPS-160 - Credits: 3.000
    Approaches to Conflict Resolution I
    Learners will be introduced to Indigenous methods of conflict resolution skills relevant to a career in public safety. This course explores trauma informed conflict resolution models and the concept of emotional intelligence to develop practical skills to enhance understanding of the trauma inflicted on Indigenous people and societies. Learners will examine Indigenous methods of resolving conflict as well as familiarize themselves with historical and contemporary events involving conflict between Indigenous people and police organizations. By developing interpersonal communication skills, learners will participate in conflict resolution dialogue that focuses on case studies as well as self-reflection activities to challenge their own attitudes, assumptions and beliefs. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: Program Admission
    ENGL-101 - Credits: 3.000
    Foundations for Academic Writing
    An introduction to reading and writing in the academic disciplines. Through the study and application of the principles of academic discourse and with emphasis on expository and persuasive writing, this course will introduce students to critical reading and academic writing. In lectures, discussions and on-line exercises, instructors will focus on skills central to academic discourse. Students will examine methods for discovering and arranging ideas, and they will consider ways in which style is determined by situation. Reading and writing assignments will require students to study, analyze, and apply principles of exposition and persuasion. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: English 12, English Studies 12, English First Peoples 12, ENGL 060, or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
    ENGL-110 - Credits: 3.000
    English Composition
    English 110 prepares students to write successful college essays. This course focuses on the writing process. Students will learn how to develop, organize, write, revise, document, and edit essays. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: ENGL 060 / or English 12 or English Studies 12 and/or English First Peoples 12 or permission of instructor.
    PSYC-111 - Credits: 3.000
    Introduction to Psychology I
    Psychology 111 is a survey course which introduces students to the field of psychology in general. Students will be encouraged to use a critical and inquiring approach to information presented to them, to be open minded, creative and divergent thinkers. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: ENGL 060 / or English 12.

    Current Course Offerings

    01 = Merritt Campus
    V1 = Burnaby Campus

    Spring 2020 (January - April)


  • ENGL-110-01
  • ENGL-110-V1
  • Fall 2020 (September - December)


  • CAPS-100-01
  • CAPS-110-01
  • CAPS-120-01
  • CAPS-140-01
  • ENGL-101-01
  • ENGL-101-V1
  • ENGL-110-01
  • ENGL-110-V1
  • PSYC-111-01
  • PSYC-111-V1
  • Spring 2021 (January - April)


  • CAPS-101-01
  • CAPS-140-V1
  • CAPS-141-01
  • CAPS-145-01
  • CAPS-150-01
  • CAPS-160-01
  • ENGL-101-01
  • ENGL-110-01
  • ENGL-110-V1
  •  

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